Hante Adventures challenge teens to grow as leaders and reach a deeper understanding of themselves within a supportive group. Check back regularly for our latest posts about Hante news, skill building, reflections and adventures. Subscribe to our blog’s RSS feed and get our news sent directly to you as we post it.

MAR. 17, 2017

Gear Selection Part One: Sleeping Bags

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Probably one of the first investments you’ll make in your outdoor career is your sleeping bag. It really sets the stage for you to get out there and make a night of it somewhere in the woods, on a couch, in the car, or even in your own backyard. It’s the tiny, little portable home you can drag with you to camp, a friend’s sleepover, or high up the Sierra Mountains. Choosing the right bag can be an agonizing task if you start to dig in to all the details and options and it’s only become harder as technology and materials advance so quickly. But if you’re looking to make the plunge here are some tips to help guide you on your first investment.

The first thing to know is that quality costs money. A good sleeping bag that will keep you warm and endure the elements will cost you more than the flannel-clad bag at Wal-Mart. Trust me when I say t hat the extra money will go a long way when you’re dry and cozy on that first wet night. If you’re feeling overwhelmed about where to start, choosing a reputable brand (North Face, Montbell, Marmot) is often a good decision as they stand behind their products with warranties and sometimes lifetime guarantees.

When searching for a bag, here are some tips to consider: First, mummy bags are fitted to the natural taper of the human body and reduce carrying weight and concentrate insulation to vital areas. Second, look for women’s specific bags if that applies to you. These sleeping systems have strategically placed insulation that helps retain warmth in areas where the female body typically loses heat. These bags will also be cut specifically to offer a better fit for women’s bodies.  Next you will want to look at fill, or insulation. Most sleeping bags these days have synthetic or down insulations, and each have unique features. Synthetic fills are more water resistant and maintain warmth and some loft (think “stay puffed”) when wet. Unfortunately synthetics tend to be a bit heavier and do not compress as well as down.  On the flip side, down (or natural feather insulation) is typically lighter for the same warmth rating, easier to compress, and tends to retain its loft quickly after unpacking.  Unfortunately down tends to turn into pancake batter when wet and loses its insulating and lofting properties.

These days there are many brands that push the limit on the materials, making down “water resistant or waterproof” or making synthetic fills that are “as light and warm as down”. Remember the basics and these will help guide your decision. For most trips that involve non-freezing weather, synthetic fill bags are preferred as you can worry less about the need for keeping it bone dry. As your trips move further and further to the sub-zero realm, you’ll look for the hi-heat and immense compressibility of down bags to seal out the cold and add a little weight to your pack. All of this brings us to my last point: compressibility. You’ll never know where your adventures may take you, or how big a pack you’ll have, first and foremost look for a sleeping bag that compresses down small.  Most manufacturers make compression sacks, and there are even some waterproof options out there. Pro-tip though: don’t store your bag compressed.  Make sure you store it loose in the mesh bag you bought it in, or nice and dry in a plastic container.  This will preserve the loft and heat for years to come.

Marlin Sill, Hante Director 

MAR. 2, 2017

Share the Adventure

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Some of the most memorable places I’ve visited make it to the top of my favorites because of the experiences I shared with those around me.  On each trip I always took a moment to look around and notice the smiling faces and mouths agape in awe. I would think, “this place is wonderful, and it is so amazing to see my own joy, happiness, and excitement mirrored in the faces around me.”

On many of my personal trips I have found that company is always welcome.  When I set out alone on an adventure I undoubtedly collect a friend or two along the way.  These travel companions help strengthen my connection to the experiences I have and the places I visit. I even feel a distinct pride in revisiting my favorite places with friends or family who’ve never been. Witnessing their awe and wonder feels like experiencing the trip for the first time all over again.

You may understand the sentiment- the one of talking about camp with a friend and feelings so excited to see them on the first day or running up to them after Capture the Flag to hear their heroic tale. You may even know the feeling as you walk your parents around camp on the last day, recounting each day and every stand-out moment as you pass through the quad and OD Board and down to the garden.

This can be more difficult with Hantes.  Every year there is a new and exciting mix of Hantes. Until you take the leap and understand what it means to “step out and learn” it can be hard to imagine how to share that with others. What sets Hante apart is that for those 2 or 3 weeks everything you do and see is shared with a small, tight-knit group of people. They will share the struggle of packing a wet tent, eating a burnt noodle and pulling their weight to see the valleys from the mountain tops.  Those moments will become tales and epic stories to be shared with friends and family that others will sit and listen to in wonder.

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Once the adventure is over it can be difficult to recreate the failures and triumphs for your friends. In truth, you will never be able to carbon copy your experience for others, but you can share the joy and satisfaction by taking them on the next one so they can see first hand. We are at that time of year when the leaves begin to bud and daydreams become warmer and lighter like the summer to come.  Start thinking back to the summers past and how you want to spend this one, or if there is someone you want to share the magic of Hante with.

Hante has an instagram: @hanteadventures

Flip back through time and see the memories others have shared for over 40 years.  You may even come across a familiar face, or even your own. Remember to share!

Marlin Sill, Hante Director

FEB. 20, 2017

Starting is the Hardest Part

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Sometimes it’s the fear of missing out that keeps you from trying something new.  And other times it’s the fear of the unknown.  Stepping out of one’s comfort zone and accepting that which we cannot control is one of the greatest lessons in life.  Failure is an innate part of learning and growth; discovering our limits while honing our successes is a key aspect of our development.  Too often we hold ourselves back for fear that the road ahead may be difficult, that we may feel embarrassed along the way, or that we may realize that we fall short of our expectations.

It can be hard to imagine yourself on a Hante but these are accessible adventures designed to develop leadership skills for anyone with a serious interest and a deep level of commitment. This year, Hante Trails aims to bridge the gap and make the leap a little smaller.  By cutting back on backpacking and instead spending more time immersed in the forest, there will be increased opportunities to connect with the natural world without too many added distractions.  Because the first three days will be spent base-camping in Pisgah Forest you won’t feel rushed to learn map and compass skills or fret about cooking dinner in a timely manner.  Once you become comfortable with the basics you can help serve the forest by removing invasive plants or building trails, skills that allow you to connect with the earth, while still returning to “base-camp” each afternoon.

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But no Hante is complete without its capstone challenge!  Your final five days will be spent backpacking a shortened trek either on the Appalachian Trail or Art Loeb.  With shorter mileage per day you’ll be able to enjoy the sport of backpacking and feel confident about returning to camp to have dinner ready by a reasonable hour. With six days to practice your camping skills, the addition of backpacking will feel like nothing more than a hike through the woods surrounded by spectacular views.

Thinking about joining a Hante is easy but making the decision to commit can be tough.  It’s the moment when you have to let off the clutch and engage the transmission.  With a few deep breaths and a positive mental attitude anything is possible. Believe in yourself and trust the program—take that little leap and come see what you can do! Who knows, maybe you’ll even surprise yourself.

Marlin Sill, Hante Director

FEB. 13, 2017

Remembering Mo Waite

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My dad meant so much to so many. He was a great, great man who will be sorely missed, but the good he brought to this world will live on in us all. To carry on all that he did will be an honor and a high task- in his wonderful memory we will do it! 

– Noni Waite-Kucera, Executive Director, Eagle’s Nest Foundation

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Dr. Benjamin Moseley (Mo) Waite, scientist, educator, conservationist, and friend and mentor to many, died February 3rd, 2017.

In 1950 Mo’s parents Dr. Alex and Hannah Waite chartered Eagle’s Nest Camp, originally founded in 1927, as a non-profit educational organization. Mo first attended camp with them as an 8-year-old boy in 1945 and continued to spend his summers at camp until he started graduate school. In the summer following his college graduation, he ran the laundry, washing all of the campers’ clothes, wringing them out and hanging them out to dry. He even pressed their jeans! In the 1970’s Mo helped found Carolina Camps for Children with Diabetes, providing life changing opportunities for children to learn to manage their illness in a camp setting. Mo has said that he found that to be “one of the most gratifying experiences I’ve had”. Mo continued his parents’ legacy by serving on the board of trustees for over 35 years.

Eagle’s Nesters through the years will remember Mo as the mountain of a man who would hike a Dutch oven or watermelons out their camping sites for them, as the red mustached man who led them on “short” hikes in the woods, or as the chief of the Migisi. Trustees will remember paddling down the rivers of Western North Carolina or washing dishes and dancing in the Sun Lodge kitchen with Mo. They’ll also remember meaningful time spent on hikes through the woods and his thoughtful guidance as President of the Board of Trustees. Some are also lucky to have a least one of the beautiful hand turned bowls that he crafted. Mo started what has now become an annual Eagle’s Nest silent auction with about 6 of these bowls. The auction now raises close to $5,000 dollars each year for camp and Outdoor Academy scholarships. So beloved was Mo that one year a fellow trustee bid $500 for an old ceramic bowl that Mo had made and that was being used to serve hummus in at the auction.

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Mo with the Eagle’s Nest Board of Trustees.

Mo graduated from Rollins College in 1958 with a Bachelor of Science degree. He continued his studies at Duke University, and in 1963 he obtained his Ph.D. in biochemistry. After postdoctoral fellowships at Duke University and in The Netherlands, he joined the faculty as an assistant professor at Bowman Gray School of Medicine in 1968.  He became the chairman of biochemistry in 1978, a position that he continued to fulfill until his retirement in 1998. He made tremendous contributions in the field of lipid biochemistry, including a landmark publication, “The Phospholipases”. He trained and was a mentor of numerous graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who have subsequently established successful research careers in both academics and industry.

He loved returning to his summer home in Maine to tend to his “deer-loved” vegetable garden and his relationships with friends and community. Mo loved the natural, bold beauty of Maine and together with Helen, his wife of 57 years, committed themselves to protecting and conserving its natural habitats. Moseley served on the board of Directors of the Downeast Coastal Conservancy for over 10 years, which, since its founding, has protected 6,330 acres of land, watersheds, islands and 62 miles of shoreline in Washington County.

Scientist, ceramicist, furniture maker, gardener, pickler, blueberry farmer, white water paddler, world traveler, bibliophile; Mo’s interests and talents ranged as wide as the circle of people who respected and loved him.

Together Mo and Helen, former Eagle’s Nest Camp Director, Executive Director, and founder of The Outdoor Academy, crafted a beautiful ship of life—each taking a turn as the mast and the rudder. Thousands of campers, students, faculty, professional peers, friends, extended family will continue to be touched by their joyful and inspiring journey through life.

Mo had an impact on so many people’s lives. In the week since his death his family has received and heard many stories that speak to his kindness, wisdom and humor. We invite you to share your stories of Mo with his family and Eagle’s Nest. Please send your stories to Noni at noni@enf.org.

A celebration of his life will be held on February 25th at Brevard College.

FEB. 9, 2017

Stay in School Kids…at Least ‘till Summer

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There’s always that moment in class when you stare out the window and daydream, and sometimes you daydream about all the places you want to be that don’t involve that classroom. So what have you been daydreaming about this week? Maybe the sea kayaking you’ll do in Washington State, or is it the climbing you’ll do in Pisgah Forest? You might even space out imagining the rolling hills in Scotland. But don’t get too caught up, there’s a lot to do between now and then. You’ll find that school will have a lot more to offer you for your Hante than you think.

“School,” you ask, “Really?” Let’s take a look at geometry for a second. For those of you thinking of coming to the Outdoor Academy (or if you’ve just left) you’ll know that much of what you learn in the classroom can relate to our “real” outdoor world. Your first look at a map or shooting a bearing with a compass will show you the relation between the gridlines on the chalkboard and the elevation profiles of the ridge you’re hiking. Or the difference of just a few degrees can put you off your mark by miles if you don’t calculate your direction of travel correctly.

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Still not sure what I’m tapping at? So maybe math isn’t your favorite, but what about literature or history? At some point in High School you may read the epic poem The Wallace, or your history teacher may show you excerpts of Braveheart.  That’s a great time to perk up and learn the history of how, for over 800 years Scotland fought so hard for independence from the English. William Wallace stands as one of Scotland’s Iconic Knights who led many successful campaigns against the English before his defeat.

Don’t forget science and natural history though. Sea Kayaking in the San Juan Islands will expose you to a plethora of ocean flora and fauna. The area is teeming not just with marine life, but a veritable buffet for marine mammals like Orca Whales, Dolphins and Sea Otters. Just south on the Olympic Peninsula you’ll find a rainforest bursting with evergreen trees, mosses, and ferns. The valleys sheltered by the massive Olympic Range towering overhead. Where water meets earth, you find streams and rivers filled with Salmon who recently found their way back upstream after the Elwha Dam removal. Eagles and bears returned to the bank of the rivers to feast, all while you pass quietly and just beyond sight, enjoying the wild as it should be: un-caged and live.

It’s very difficult to appreciate the beauty and understand the complexity of our world without a backbone of knowledge to build from. Yes, many centuries ago we lived simply, walking the earth without much needed beyond our basic needs. Times have changed, and whether for the good or bad, we must adapt. Part of that process should be absorbing all the information you can. Consume every morsel of information, so that as you step out and walk through the landscapes you can connect in new and exciting ways.

Marlin Sill, Hante Director