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NOV. 14, 2017

Our Relationship with Food

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In Environmental Seminar, we have been examining our relationship with food. We started by looking at the facts of where our food comes from, from the industrial food chain of conventional meat, produce and processed food to the organic and /or local farming operations. We’ve asked ourselves some difficult questions, such as “If I am going to eat meat, should I be able to kill an animal?” and “What are the hidden costs such as food miles required to eat organic produce in the winter?” We’ve debated the merits and challenges of chosen diets, from omnivore to vegetarian, vegan to freegan, and found that there are many “right” ways to eat, not just one. We’ve explored different concepts around eating traditions, such as our family’s food culture, eating seasonally, and homesteading, and we’ve expanded our view to explore the global impact of food, such as food shortages, riots, and food economics. We’ve explored the impact of corn and soy in our diet, especially around our physical health.

For as many questions as we answer, there are more that are raised. The privilege of our food choices in this country create many opportunities for experimentation and exploration, and in this class we have tried to look at each new concept from all points of view, even those not as popular or exciting. It’s easy to demonize one type of food culture and glorify another, until you explore all sides of the issue. My hope is that these students emerge from this class with the understanding that in order to really make smart choices about the food that we eat, we all have to be a bit of a detective. Look at the food labels. Ask the farmer at the farmer’s market about her spraying practices.  Do the research to determine if migrant workers rights were abused in the growing of this food. It’s not easy, and sometimes you don’t want to know, but it’s important.

If there’s one thing we’ve learned together, it’s the power of the individual to make a difference. As Michael Pollan said, we get to vote three times a day with what we choose to eat. Students are encouraged to find farmers in their area at home, to go to a farmer’s market, and to investigate what CSA’s are available in their community. In a few weeks, we will learn how to start a small garden at home. Our relationship with food can be global, and it can be in our own backyard. Learning how to balance the two is the challenging opportunity of our time, and these students are well on their way toward embracing that challenge.

Susan Daily, Outdoor Academy Student Dean